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for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> pporalso comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show
woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape i
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air trav, starng in apl. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and c
's presidency." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided byhe park fodation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> good evening, everyone, as we watch the making of the president 2008. there are ten... >> as for the senator's schedule tonight, he is now at the hyatt regency hotel. he will watch the election returns and then... >> ohio is gone for obama... >> it is now 11:00 on the east coast and keith, we can report history. >> barack obama is projected to be the next president. >> senator barack obama of illinois will be the next president... >> narrator: november 4, 2008. on this night, in chicago, inside barack obama's private world,
possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, with a grant from scott nathan and laura debonis. >> polls open across the... >> it's going to be a fierce battle for control of the house and the senate... >> one of the most closely watched midterm elections in years... >> decision day, voters across america head to the polls for midterm elections, with control of congress hanging in the balance... >> 435 house seats are in contention... >> and on top of that, 37 senate races and 37 governor's races will also be decided today... >> narrator: november 2010. president barack obama anxiously waited for the midterm election results. >> you can't understand what happened
's movement and the pbs documentary, "makers: women who make america." >> we have realized that a majority of americans fully agree that women can do what men can do but we haven't yet realized that men can do what women do. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending c
by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additial fding iprovid by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> although this downturn started in the housing sector and inhe financial sector, you're seeing a lot of things being hit. >> today's numbers suggest job losses are accelerating. >> that's the biggest loss since 1974. the unemployment rate... >> narrator: in 2009, wall street bankers were on the defensive. the great american mortgage bubble had burst. >> this is a huge amount of money. >> narrator: the economy was in ruins and wall street bankers were being blamed. bankers admitted they had miscalculated. but they were also worried that they could be held criminally liable for fraud.
on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a u.s. security firm charged today there's an all-out effort to break into computer systems in the u.s. and elsewhere. the report laid out an extensive case against china and its military. the newest allegations of cyber attacks by the chinese government came up at the white house today. reporters asked spokesman jay carney about a study that blames china's military for a large-scale years-long hacking campaign. >> we have repeatedly raised our concerns at the highest levels about cyber attacks with senior chinese officials, including in the military, and we will c
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: there may be hope yet for bringing the national epidemic of obesity under control. at least, the latest numbers on calories and fast food, released today, indicated possible progress. for years, health officials have warned about americans' growing girth. now, research from the centers for disease control and prevention suggests the fight against fat may be having an effect. among the findings: american children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than a decade before-- 7% less for boys and 4% less for girls. and for adults, fast food accounted for just over 11% of the calories consum
funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> is program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house described it as a terrorist attack. th explosion occurred around 1:15 p.m. local time. afterward, police tried to hold back the crowd gathered outside the u.s. facility in the turkish capital. debris littered the street near a side entrance where the blast took place. emergency workers wheeled one of the injured
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. > anwithhe ooingupport of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: millions of people in the northeast and new england battened down for a weekend blizzard today. forecasters warned it could be one for the record books. by this afternoon, the gathering storm was beginning to whiten the landscape for hundreds of miles, with long hours of snowfall still to come. fueling the fall, two low- pressure systems-- one from the midwest, the other from the southeast-- colliding over the northeast and new england. blizzard warnings were posted in seven states from new jersey on up to maine. at least three declared emergencies, and schools
's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like this in my life. the pope has to be there unti
." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world.additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and millicent bell, through the millicent and eugene bell foundation. major funding for this program is provided by the kendeda fund. >> chicago is now under full national security. >> a no-fly zone is in effect, except for the world leaders who are landing at o'hare, as president barack obama and a number of world leaders... >> hockenberry: it was a big weekend in chicago. last spring, the president was in town, along with the leaders of nato, to discuss threats to global security and nuclear proliferation. at a huge convention center, the eyes of the world were watching. >> ...that demands globa
: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it was the starkest statement yet on the possible effect of automatic federal budget cuts, due to begin in nine days, on march first. defense secretary leon panetta notified his entire civilian work force that employees could be sent home without pay. the warning was aimed at defense department workers at the pentagon and around the world. secretary panetta sent them a written message, as he left for a nato defense ministers meeting in brussels. in it, he said there are limited options for coping with the looming across-the-board cuts. and, he said: >> on our civilians it will be catastrophic. >> woodruff: within hours, top pentagon officials were out, saying employees could lose one day of work per week for 22 weeks. civilians will experience
technology. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama and congressional republicans traded barbs today, opening the final week before the looming sequester. but there was no outward sign of a breakthrough to prevent $85 billion in automatic spending reductions. >> these cuts do not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> suarez: the president's appeal came as he met with the nation's governors at the white house amid growing indications that the sequester will indeed take effect. >> this town has to get past its
it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama made his first second-term foray outside washington today, with a call to stop gun violence. it was part of a campaign-style effort designed to goad congress into action. >> we don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammun
on twitter and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's alwaymuchore on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. ♪ >>> major funding is providing by the lily endowme, a minnesota-based private foundation. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designi designing customized individual and group products, and the corporation for public broadcasting.
anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website, including more of kim lawton's interviews with tobymac and lecrae. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, tobymac. ♪ ♪
and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, scenes of ash wednesday at the vatican, where pope benedict xvi celebrated what is expected to have been his last public mass as pope. ♪ ♪ ♪ . >> announcer: major funding is provided by the lily endowment, an indianapolis-based private family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the
-attack against the "new york times." that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapon
on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a leaked document today put the spotlight back on lethal strikes by the u.s. government on u.s. citizens abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now
on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on saturdays. but home and business mail would end. the move would save an estimated $2 billion annually. the postal service ended the last budget year with a record loss, nearly $16 billion. today's decision was criticized by several members of congress who may try to overule the agency. and the head of the letter carrier's union called the move "a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect." joining us now is postmaster general patrick donohoe. and welcome to you. you spoke today being in a "very scary position financially." how scary? >> well, here's where we are right flow. now. as you mentioned we had a pretty subst
's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the man picked to lead the central intelligence agency was called today to defend his positions in the war on terror. john brennan's senate confirmation hearing revolved around several hotly debated policies. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman has our report. reporr: even before the hearing got truly under way, protesters from code pink disrupted john brennan's opening statement-- signaling that passions were running high on the targeted killings of terror suspects. >> they won't even tell congress what c
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a history of discrimination-- mainly in the deep south-- to get federal approval, or pre- clearance, before changing voting procedures or districs. lewis argued the provision-- known as "section five"-- must be preserved. >> there are still forces in this country that want to take us back to another period, but we're n
to receive. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 18
anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and vio podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, the israeli gospel choir from tel aviv performing at congregation rodeph sholom in new york city. ♪ >> major funding for religion and ethics news weekly is provided by the lilly endowment, dedicated to the founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting.
tomorrow night on pbs. joining me now two women featured in the fill, gloria steinem, she is an icon and a legend in the women's movement. also next generation feminist amy richards. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: great to see you. >> thank you. >> rose: so what question does this film answer? >> well, i would say there are two things, the past. >> rose: yeah. >> and history. and we have been half of the past. and 1% of history. so this is the other half of history. i mean it's not just women's history, it's history. >> rose: do you have a sense that the 21st century is a century for women? >> no, i definitely think so and hope so but of course it does depend on what we do every day. it's not automatic. but i think what is happening now in the second half of the women's movement because they have to last a century, you know to be permanent is that we are gunning to understand the connections. we're beginning to understand that you can't perpetuate racism without controlling reproduction and that means more discrimination against women.
follow me on twitter @bonnie erbe and @tothecontrary and check our new website, pbs.org/tothecontrary where the discussion continues. whether you agree or tnk, to the contrary, please join us next time. >> funding for "to the ctrary" provided by: the cornell douglas foundation committed to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. for a copy of "to the contrary" please contactederal news service at 1-888-343-1940.
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thk you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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